Bite sized pieces....

My feet hitting the floor at 5:40 am, a surge of energy running through me, I rushed around the house performing the morning's usual tasks.  

The bath water ran while I turned on the teapot, emptied the dishwasher, threw the sheets in the wash, folded a load of laundry, checked my email and looked in refrigerator contemplating tonight's dinner.  

The tub was full. Time to get ready for the day.  Having worked for 45 years, I can put myself together in 20 minutes providing I don't get distracted stopping to watch the news story of the day on the TV in our room.

By the time I got the sheets into the dryer for the 70 minute cycle, I found myself walking in circles around the house, my eyes scanning the cupboards, the drawers, the closets, filled with the "things" of our lives, yet to be tackled.  I felt my heart race; a little bit of fear, a little bit of angst, a tinge of sorrow. 

Letting go?  Letting go. Day by day. "Bite sized pieces" keeps running through my mind, the words I used daily to remind my precious sister Julie to hang on as she went through lengthy and agonizing breast cancer treatment about 4 years ago. She survived, thank God, with  a level of grace that I so admired and with a hope for the future, that has proven to serve her well.

Of course, there is no comparison with these life events but the simplicity of thinking in terms of "bite sized pieces" has a magical way of putting our apprehension and fear in perspective allowing us each day to bite off a little piece of the challenge while continuing to deal with it, day after day. 

I keep reminding myself of the upcoming sense of freedom and adventure facing us.  But now, with 3 months and 23 days to go, the reality of the looming tasks, many of which are too soon to complete now, I could easily  throw myself into a tailspin.  

Taking a deep breath, I don't choose the tailspin, thinking, "what can I bite off today to lighten the load?"

We have found as we age, our ability to handle challenges changes. Somewhere along the way, both Tom and I have accepted that emotional upheaval is pointless, "drama" is used to elicit a response from others, stress is damaging to one's health, and loud vocalization (yelling) to those you love (or not) doesn't solve problems but creates them.  Again simple, again
magical with the ultimate goal of contentment, entirely attainable, not at all elusive.

At 8:30 am, I packed up our six year old grandson Vincent, driving him to Gale Woods Farm for his second of five days in "farm camp" a short jaunt from our home. Three hours later, having completed multiple errands, I returned home,
feeling a sense of accomplishment for having taken several "bite sized pieces"
out of the daunting tasks that are looming.

Walking into the familiar smells in our home; remnants of last night's dinner
along with the orange organic cleaner I used this morning to clean the kitchen, a wave of accomplishment washed over me.

In only a few short months this life as we've known it, will be over with a new life to begin its place. We'll continue to take "bite sized pieces" with contentment, joy and wonder as our ultimate goal.

Looking around the house at the cupboards, the drawers, the closets and the
"things" I knew it will all get done and...it will all be OK.
 

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