Is a good memory needed for travel? How I improved my memory after it started to decline...

Peculiarly, my memory is better now than when it was when I was 20 years old (so I think).  When I turned 50, while working at a stressful job, my memory started deteriorating rapidly.  I expected to be a mindless blob at 60, let alone, my now almost 65.  

I'd find myself wandering around a room, wondering why I was there, forgetting my keys (don't we all?).  On occasion, I'd get into a stranger's unlocked car in a parking lot that happened to be the same color and model  as mine. That scared me. Remember names? Forget about it!  Impossible, at that time.

About 10 years ago, I started working out after a five year hiatus during the stressful job.  The more I worked out, the more I noticed that my memory was gradually improving over time.  

Changing to a low inflammation diet and upgrading my exercise routine over the past year as I wrote in a post two weeks ago, gradually enhanced and thus, creating a leap in my memory. Plus, spending seemingly endless hours researching for our adventure, pushed my memory to a whole new level.
 
To sum up what worked for me:
3. "Exercising my brain" via hours of research, learning new information, decision making.
4.  Being passionate about any topic of interest which fires up brain cells.

Many studies suggest stress relieving activities such as meditation, yoga, and Pilate's may be instrumental in improving one's memory.  For me, learning new information is fuel for my soul, providing great stress relief and enjoyment. Thus, my memory improved.

Through this lengthy and time consuming process of planning to travel the world for years to come, I discovered that good memory was a benefit of good record keeping.  

Documenting our travel plans in a methodical order on an series of Excel spreadsheets within a single workbook was highly instrumental in building a foundation for our itinerary.  Keeping detailed records of our itinerary, deposits paid, balances due, a to do list, an estimate of eventual "actual" travel and living expenses, cruises, flights and other means of travel is a constant point of reference leading to building my memory.  

Subsequently, referring to this Excel workbook, without even trying, somehow I've memorized every detail.  Much to my surprise.  Its seems to me that, "the more I remember, the more I remember."  This is a far cry from where I was over ten years ago.
 
Dementia is a common and expected fact of aging.  We see it in our family members, friends and acquaintances.  We witness lapses of memory in our loved ones, dismissing it, in part for fear of embarrassing them and also, for our own vulnerability. 

Perhaps, we may be able to prevent our own memory loss by being physically active, eating healthfully and living a proactive life. If we stay engaged, busy, passionate about our lives, purposefully and frequently memorizing tidbits of information while entering into lively animated conversations (easy to do in this heated political environment), we can retain and actually improve our memory. 

If we read to learn, not only to entertain and listen to others with undivided attention, maybe, just maybe, we will remember, not only what happened 40 years ago and also last year and... most of all, minutes and hours ago.

After all, every step of our lives is but a memory only minutes later.  Drawing upon those memories is the essence of life's richness to share with those we love, to gather into our hearts in times of sorrow and to take with us into our old age.

As I close for today, it would be typical for one to make a joke, a play on words on memory loss.  I won't.  I can't think of any!

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