Part 1, Hubbard Glacier, Alaska...Wow! Wow! Wow!...

Tom , hatless and happy anyway!
Please note: We're finalizing the head count for the "Meet & Greet" for our readers in Minneapolis on June 9th from 5 pm to 8 pm at
Grizzly's Wood Fired Grill at this location in Plymouth, Minnesota:
220 Carlson Pkwy N, Plymouth, MN 55447

Please RSVP if you plan to attend and haven't already done so.  Hope to see you then!
As we began posting this morning as we were nearing the Hubbard Glacier and we were both bundled up in our warmest clothing, prepared to bolt outdoors as the ship made the approach although not cold in the realm of Alaskan weather and we were very excited to get as near to the glacier as possible. 

Me, bundled up and freezing my you-know-what off!
 For details on this massive glacier please see below from this site:

"Hubbard Glacier

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hubbard Glacier
Hubbard landsat-tn.jpg
False color image of the Hubbard Glacier
TypeTidewater/Mountain glacier AKA Valley Glacier
LocationYakutat City and Borough, Alaska, U.S., Yukon, Canada
Coordinates60°18′50″N 139°22′15″WCoordinates: 60°18′50″N 139°22′15″W
Length122 kilometers (76 mi)
TerminusSealevel
StatusAdvancing
Hubbard Glacier is a glacier located in eastern Alaska and part of Yukon, Canada, and named after Gardiner Hubbard.


Map of Hubbard Glacier

Hubbard Glacier, Alaska, squeezes towards Gilbert Point on May 20, 2002. The glacier is close to sealing off Russell Fjord at the top from Disenchantment Bay at the bottom.
The longest source for Hubbard Glacier originates 122 kilometers (76 mi) from its snout and is located at about 61°00′N 140°09′W, approximately 8 kilometers (5 mi) west of Mount Walsh with an elevation around 11,000 feet (3,400 m). A shorter tributary glacier begins at the easternmost summit on the Mount Logan ridge at about 18,300 feet (5,600 m) at about 60°35′0″N 140°22′40″W.
Before it reaches the sea, Hubbard is joined by the Valerie Glacier to the west, which, through forward surges of its own ice, has contributed to the advance of the ice flow that experts believe will eventually dam the Russell Fjord from Disenchantment Bay waters.
The Hubbard Glacier ice margin has continued to advance for about a century. In May 1986, the Hubbard Glacier surged forward, blocking the outlet of Russell Fjord and creating "Russell Lake." All that summer, the new lake filled with runoff; its water level rose 25 meters (82 ft), and the decrease in salinity threatened its sea life.[1]
Around midnight on October 8, the dam began to give way. In the next 24 hours, an estimated 5.3 cubic kilometers (1.3 cup mi) of water gushed through the gap, and the fjord was reconnected to the ocean at its previous level.[1] This was the second largest glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) in recorded history and had the equivalent flow of about 35 Niagara Falls.
In spring 2002, the glacier again approached Bert Point. It pushed a terminal moraine ahead of its face and closed the opening again in July. On August 14, the terminal moraine was washed away after rains had raised the water level behind the dam it formed to 18 m (59 ft) above sea level.[2] The fjord could become dammed again, and perhaps permanently. If this happens, the fjord could overflow its southern banks and drain through the Situk River instead, threatening trout habitat and a local airport.
It takes about 400 years for ice to traverse the length of the glacier, meaning that the ice at the foot of the glacier is about 400 years old. The glacier routinely calves[3] off icebergs the size of a ten-story building. Where the glacier meets the bay, most of the ice is below the waterline, and newly calved icebergs can shoot up quite dramatically so that ships must keep their distance from the edge of the glacier in Disenchantment Bay."
Now, late in posting, we're rushing to upload today's post with the first round of Hubbard Glacier photos we took while standing for several hours on the deck in the icy cold weather totally entranced by the sight before our eyes.  We had no idea how magnificent it would be.

By noon, after the close sailing to the glacier, we'd scheduled to meet Diane and Helen for lunch in the dining room.  We'd met them on the last RC cruise from Sydney to Seattle, finally managing to find one another on the Solstice so we could catch up.
Photos don't do this massive glacier justice.
Cafe al Bacio was packed when we arrived after the enjoyable long lunch so we sat with another couple for a half hour and chatted while we waited for a table in our usual spot along the railing.

A table opened up only a short time ago and soon we were situated at our favorite table and chairs, all in the ergonomically correct position for ultra comfortable typing and researching.

As soon as we upload today's post, we'll return to the cabin to shower and dress for the evening.  Thank goodness tonight is "casual" dress which makes the prep time quick and painless.

The remainder of the day includes a Cruise Critic private party in one of the "royal" suites on the 11th deck to which we're invited and will attend.  Afterward, we're meeting a couple in the Captain's Club lounge for happy hour from 5:00 pm until 7:00 pm. 

Then, we're off to dinner in the Epernay Dining Room where we'll share a table with other passengers who enjoy sharing.  By 9:00 pm, we'll take off for the night's entertainment in the Solstice Theatre.  We've discovered we prefer to sit on the balcony level of the theater preferably in a back row.
While we watched there were numerous "calvings", the equivalent of an avalanche on a glacier.  A loud sonic type boom followed several seconds later.  It was unreal!
If a show doesn't entertain us, inconspicuously, we can slip away.  With both of us possessing "short attention spans" we seldom find one of us prefer to stay for the show unless it extra special.  It's not uncommon for one or both of us to nod off during a show.
Over these next few days, we'll share the balance of our Hubbard Glacier photos and our up-close-and-personal experiences in participating in this extraordinary observational event.
Thanks to our readers for hanging with us during these past 30 nights of cruising "less the two nights we spent in Vancouver before boarding the Solstice).
With only four days remaining until we disembark on Friday, catching our flight to Minneapolis, our hearts are filled with enthusiasm to see our loved ones once again.  Lots more Hubbard Glacier photos will follow tomorrow!
Have a lovely evening and be well and happy.
________________________________________________
Photo from one year ago today, May 22, 2016:

This close up of my dinner in Bali appeared to be a lot of chicken  But, once I dig in there are only a few good bites on each leg and thigh section.  Tom eats the two breasts which are a little meatier but the dark meat which I prefer is sparse as a result of locally lean free range chickens.  For more Bali photos, please click here.
D

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