Last post with Varanasi photos...Visit to a textile company...King of Brocade Weaving Centre...

Exquisite handmade silk brocade made on site at Tiwari International.
We are experiencing awful Wi-Fi issues at the Ramada Hotel in Khajuraho, India. The town is considerably smaller than many we've visited over the past three weeks and without a doubt, this is the worse signal we've experienced.
The quality of the work is evident in every piece.
I have been trying, off and on for the past several hours to complete and upload today's post about a fantastic silk-weaving facility we visited on our last day in Varanasi.
Neatly arranged shelves with countless fabrics in varying designs and colors.
From time to time, over the past seven plus years we've been traveling, we've had an opportunity to describe and subsequently promote a small business we encounter along the way. 

Whether is a barbershop, gift shop, street vendor, or luxury shop as we describe today, we've always enjoyed sharing details with our many worldwide readers.
Shelves are lined with stunning fabrics suitable for both the wardrobe for Indian women and men, tourists and for many household goods such as draperies, furniture, bedspreads, pillows, etc.
Should any of you decide to visit Varanasi in the future, the stunning shop is definitely worth a visit. I drooled over the gorgeous Pashmina shawls, and scarves and only wish I'd had room in my luggage for one or two.
The staff was busy working with customers.
Unfortunately, after recently paying the airlines for overweight baggage, there was no way I could purchase even the lightest item and have it make sense. Plus, I am not one to wear scarves often when I attempt to keep my clothing accessories to a minimum.

But, as we travel throughout India we find most women, Indian and tourists wearing scarves and shawls. In seems that once women arrive in India from other countries, they immediately adopt the scarf concept in order to blend in with the population.
The shop also offered a wide array of ready-made clothing including scarves and Pashmina shawls.
On the Maharajas Express we all received no less than eight scarves as gifts at various stations as welcome gifts. I will have no choice but to give them away along the way. No doubt they contributed to my bag being overweight when some of them were fairly heavy.

But, few travelers have our same issue of "traveling light" and many tourists come to India for the shopping which is exceptionally exciting in this land of diversity and color.
The owner escorted us to the fabricating area where a diligent weaver was hard at work.
Tiwari International appears to be a family owned business. With the shop so busy when we arrived we had little time to speak to the owner/manager Kershav Tiwari who was extremely kind and welcoming, even knowing we were "lookers," not "shoppers."

He was excited to share the fact that actress Goldie Hawn had recently visited the shop, as he pointed to the framed photo on the wall as shown here in our photo. They were so proud to have a celebrity visit but equally enthused to welcome us.
This photo of actress Goldie Hawn hung on the wall in the shop. The staff was proud she'd come to visit and purchase a number of products.
We told Kershav about our visit to India and our site and promised him a story with today's photos as a thank you for showing us around. He couldn't have been more pleased, as were we.

The quality of their products is breathtaking and we reveled in every category of cloth he showed us. Of course, we were in awe of the workmanship he showed us by one of his workers, diligently at work on a loom. 
The finest of detail went into this lovely brocade, almost completed.
When he explained how time-consuming and deliberate the work is, we were all the more in awe of his massive inventory. Prices are reasonable and support staff is available to assist in selections.

From their website, the following:


"Banarasi Brocades, as the world knows it, is called by the name kinkab in Varanasi. A high-quality weaving is done using gold and silver threads. Silk Threads are also used as well. The most common motifs include scroll patterns and butidars designs. The other designs are Jewelry designs, birds, animals, flowers, creepers, paisley motifs. Hindu religious and Mughal motifs also influenced brocade designs. When a Gold embellishment is done on a silver background it is called Ganga-Jamuna in the local language.

This elderly weaver spent long days working at these looms.
The designs are first drawn on paper. The person who draws the layout is called Naqshbandi. The main weaver is assisted by a helper. This design is then woven on a small wooden frame to form a grid of warp and weft. 
The process is slow and painstaking requiring intense concentration and expertise.
The requisite number of warp threads and the extra weft threads are woven on the loom. The famous tissue sari of Varanasi is unbelievably delicate, combining the use of gold and silver metallic threads."

It was fascinating to observe the complicated and time- consuming process.
Finally, attention from Kershav was required and we bid him thanks and goodday with a typical Indian hands-together-bow and we on our way back out into the crazy traffic of Varanasi.
We had an opportunity to handle this finest of silk made by worms and of great value.
It was delightful, as always, to see how local products are made, adding even more substance and interest to sightseeing outings.

That's it for today. Now, the challenge of uploading this post. Tomorrow, we're embarking on an exciting road trip which begins at 8:30 am taking us to one of our most sought-after adventures in India...eight days of safari in two distinct national parks where we'll live in camps. Yeah!
Artistic design, coupled with great skill produces such fine works as this.
Thanks to all of you for the many birthday wishes. Your kindness means the world to me!

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