Wednesday was a travel day...Now amid more safaris at Kanha National Park...


Note: All of today's photos were taken from the car on yesterday's road trip. No captions needed.

Yesterday as I wrote this post we were in a crisp clean white SUV with aircon comparable to other vehicles that have been transporting us from one location to another.

It was travel day, once again with an expected 5½ hours drive until we'd reach our destination and yet another safari camp, Tuli Tiger Resort, this time to Kanha National Park where we'd be spending another four nights with two game drives each day.

The drive is interrupted every three or four kilometers by small towns line with shops vendors selling fruits vegetables clothing and a variety of tourist goods and household goods for the locals.

Cows, dogs, and goats wander through the streets aimlessly in search of the next meal and women walk with baskets of food and other items atop their heads, while men congregate in small groups discussing the events of the day.

The woman wear colorful Hindu costumes impeccably draped and pleated regardless of their income level of poverty. The beautiful garb us unike any other we've seen in the world. Although each town may have its own personality the premise of the Hindu philosophy is evident in every aspect of creating a certain familiarity from town to town.

Once back out on the highway the landscape is brown and somewhat desolate, scattered with trees and vegetation of one sort or another. 
It's winter time here and until the monsoon season arrives everything the grasses remain brown and less hearty for the cows and other animals in search of good grazing fields.

With nary a patch of green for meandering cows and sheep, they often seek out public areas in hopes of food donations from the locals who appear at times to be very generous with their sacred cows. Hindus have a love of all creatures, both human and animals.

People often smile and wave as we pass through. School children in freshly pressed school uniforms play together in the streets without a toy or a ball and yet seem happy and content in their lives .

Their simple life is accepted with a powerful faith not so much as a religion but as a way of life leaving them grateful and accepting of whatever lifestyle they've been provided.

We are humbled and in awe of their dedication and their strength as they work their way through any obstacles life presents them. Many have no access to medical care, modern conveniences, clean water and in many cases such taken for granted commodities such as electricity.

These individuals and families work together however they can to create the best life possible without complaint, without disharmony and without a longing for what could have been.

I often think of all the times I'd grumbled when making a call for customer service to end up with a heavily-accented Indian person on the line, often working in a hot uncomfortable boiler room taking calls for various digital and computer equipment companies all the way from India to provide customer service for companies in the US. Now,I have an entirely different perspective.


In a land of 1.3 billion people there's is little to no government subsidies such as welfare, food stamps or government assistance. Overall, Indian people are on their own.


We've seen less homeless people here in India in the almost month we have been here than we saw in an equal time in the US. That speaks for itself and the powerful work ethic and life values imposed by their Hindu strength and principles.               

This morning at 5:30 am we began our first morning safari from the resort. We didn't see any tigers yet but we have five more safaris scheduled at this location, including another today at 2:30 pm. 
By the time we return for the afternoon game drive at 6:30 pm, we'll freshen up for dinner, dine at 8:00 pm and head to bed shortly thereafter. Its a busy and exhausting day but typical in the lives of wildlife enthusiasts like ourselves.

Have a fantastic day and night!
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Photo from one year ago today, February 27, 2019:
The kudus give us "the look," which means "more pellets please." For more photos, please click here.

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