What am I doing about an abscess tooth during times of Covid-19?...Mating season in the bush...


Elephants digging into a dirt wall in Kruger National Park. We'll never know why.
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Today's photos are from May 27, 2018, from Kruger National Park, South Africa.  Please click here for more details.
When posting past photos and videos we're reminded of all the fantastic experiences we've had in the past barring the three months of my confinement in 2019 and no over two months in lockdown in India.

During this peculiar lengthy period in lockdown our past stories, photos and videos have put a smile on our faces. No doubt, the question remains...will we ever be able to return to our lives of world travel or will this current pandemic put a damper on travel into the future for us and for the world?

As we've mentioned many times, we don't know, the world doesn't know. Only time will tell, when and if it may be possible for us to continue on. In the interim, we find ourselves often reading past posts, looking at photos, and watching videos, often chuckling over our past experiences.
Four "Big Daddy" kudus stopped by with one female, all vying for her attention.  They were more interested in her than pellets.
But, the present is what we have to deal with and face full-on which right now means an abscessed tooth that is quite bothersome. Before we left South Africa one year ago, in May 2019, and three months after I'd had triple coronary bypass surgery I went to our wonderful dentist in Komatipoort to see if she could work on a tooth that was bothering me a little.

Trusting Luzanne as much as I do I took her advice to heart (literally and figuratively) to wait at least a year for any invasive dental work which in this case, most likely would require a root canal and crown. 

Since it wasn't bothering me much, other than an occasional twinge when I chewed down on it, I didn't give it another thought until about a few weeks ago when my face, particularly my right cheek, was feeling funny, more of a dull ache than a sharp pain, coming and going throughout the day.
Kudus sniff the female to ensure she's ready to mate.
With no doctor's offices open or safe to visit during the lockdown, I had no choice but to treat this myself as mentioned in a prior post. After two rounds of antibiotics, the second of which I received from a local pharmacy that delivered them to the hotel, I began to be concerned. What's the problem? Why wasn't it getting better

I only needed relief to last long enough to get us to our dentist in South Africa or another dentist in any other country we may visit while we wait for the SA's borders to open.

By the way, I wrote about this in a prior post. Click the link
here.  Anyway, on day 5 of the new antibiotics and the situation not improving, I knew I had no choice but to find a dentist allowed and willing to help me during times of Covid-19. That was a daunting task in itself. They were all closed during the lockdown, leaving suggestions for suffering dental patients to go to the local hospital with a dental emergency.
This male was the "kingpin" and kept the three other mature males away.  Check out the size of his neck which enlarges during mating season.
There was no way that I'd be willing to walk into a local hospital, jammed packed with Covid-19 patience. I persisted contacting several dentists to no avail when finally, a five-star rated dentist, Dr. Kavita Kumar, only 10 minutes from here was willing to help.

After taking photos of my face and tooth (tricky to accomplish) and sending them via WhatsApp and after talking to her at length, she's agreed to see me on Friday or Saturday. She's waiting for her supply of PPE (personal protective equipment) to arrive in the next day or so and hopes to see me by Friday or Saturday.

Definitely, she stated, due to my recent heart surgery, she will not perform a root canal or crown feeling it is too invasive at this time and under these particularly delicate times. 
Even Frank and The Mrs. were busy working at building a nest in the bush in our yard.
However, she'll take a full head x-ray and perform a comprehensive exam after which she'll come up with an alternate plan of attack that should see me through the next several months. She explained that in some cases an abscess can be treated without invasive treatment. We shall see.

I informed the hotel reception desk that I will need a ride to the dentist while the driver waits for me during the appointment. No problem. Am I worried about going out? Not really. I will be well prepared with a face mask and gloves on for the drive and ask for goggles during the exam.

Based on the photos of the dentist's office online I can only hope this highly professional dental practice has taken and will take every precaution. I have no choice. I have to proceed.
Warthogs testicles become engorged during the mating season.
Yes, I am sick and tired of having medical issues. I guess if we were like "normal people" we'd live in a retirement community in a warm climate with a regular doctor and dentist at our disposal as needed requiring no mention here whatsoever.

Hopefully, by the end of the weekend, I'll have an action plan in place and continue to go back to worrying about when we'll get out of here!

Stay safe. Stay healthy.
______________________________________
Photo from one year ago today, May 27, 2019:
Connemara marble is described as follows from this site: "Connemara is bounded on three sides by the Atlantic Ocean and encompasses a wide variety of natural and semi-natural habitats, reflecting its great geomorphologic and geological complexity. It also has diverse economic resources. Among the more unusual are extensive deposits of soapstone and veins of green marble and vivid white quartz. In Neolithic times, the green marble was traded as far away as Lough Gur, County Limerick, and possibly to the Boyne Valley. ‘Connemara Marble’ is a serpentine-rich rock, popular since ancient times as a decorative facing stone. With its ‘forty shades of green’ and its wild patterns, it represents perfectly the landscapes of the Emerald Isle. Connemara Marble inspired artists, architects, and artisans throughout the world. Jewelry and other small objects such as key rings, coasters, and crosses are also made with this unique stone." For more information about our tour of the Connemara Heritage and History Centre, please click here.

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